Archive for February 2013

SAGGING SKIN NEWS (Facelift & Anti-Aging Venus Freeze Treatments)

New treatments which can successively improve loose areas of the skin.

There are some things that a skin cream can tackle. Gravity isn’t one of them. Which is why treating droopy areas requires an in office-quick fix.

Venus Freeze which directs an painless combination of Radio frequency & Electromagnetic pulses into the skin in six to ten sittings.

A study by Celebrity New York  Dermatologist Dr. Sadick found that ten treatments improved the wrinkle around the eye by more than 50%.
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ELEVATED C-REACTIVE PROTEIN (CRP)

Elevated C-reactive Protein (CRP)

What is elevated C-reactive protein?

C-reactive protein (CRP) is a substance produced by the liver that increases in the presence of inflammation in the body. An elevated CRP level is identified with blood tests and is considered a non-specific “marker” for disease. Data from a large number of studies suggest that over time chronic, imperceptible, low-level internal inflammation can lead to many serious, age-related diseases including heart disease, some forms of cancer and neurodegenerative conditions such asAlzheimer’s and Parkinson’s disease.

However, CRP levels don’t appear to help predict the risk of heart disease in patients already being treated for risks such as high blood pressure or high LDL (“bad”) cholesterol. A 2010 analysis of British data on 4,853 patients found that CRP levels didn’t yield any more information about the risk of heart disease than LDL (“bad”) cholesterol levels or high blood pressure in patients who already were being treated with a cholesterol-lowering statin drug or with medication to lower blood pressure.

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CONTROLLING HIGH CHOLESTEROL

 Controlling High Cholesterol

High cholesterol is a well-known risk factor in heart disease. This waxy, fat-like substance comes from the diet, but is primarily made by the liver, and is an essential component of cell membranes. The body also uses it to produce hormones and vitamin D.

Cholesterol is carried through the bloodstream attached to two different compounds called lipoproteins: low-density lipoproteins (LDL) and high-density lipoproteins (HDL). LDL is commonly known as the “bad cholesterol”; it carries cholesterol from the liver throughout the body, making it available and potentially allowing it to be deposited in artery walls. HDL is known as the “good cholesterol”; it picks up cholesterol from the blood and delivers it to cells that use it, or back to the liver to be recycled or eliminated from the body.

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CONGESTIVE HEART FAILURE (CHF)

Congestive Heart Failure (CHF)

What is congestive heart failure?

Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a very serious heart condition in which the heart cannot pump enough blood to meet the body’s circulatory needs. Even though the condition typically worsens over time, it is possible to live with the disease for many years.

What are the symptoms of congestive heart failure?

As a result of congestive heart failure, fluid may collect in the lower legs, causing swelling, or in the lungs, causing shortness of breath. Other symptoms may include:

• Fatigue and weakness, particularly during physical exertion as a result of insufficient oxygen reaching the muscles.
• Swelling in the lower extremities. If the right side of the heart is affected, fluid builds up in the feet, ankles and legs. Left-sided heart insufficiency can cause fluid retention in the lungs, leading to shortness of breath.

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CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE

Cardiovascular Disease

These four conditions are associated with cardiovascular disease: atherosclerosis, insulin resistance, high homocysteine and angina pectoris.

Atherosclerosis – Overview

Atherosclerosis is a condition in which cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along the arterial walls. Atherosclerosis is thought to develop when an injury occurs to the endothelial (inside) lining along the artery wall. In response to the injury, white blood cells, along with lipids, begin to accumulate along the inner layer of the artery. The muscle layer of the artery may also grow, forming the basis of a plaque, which many grow large enough to block the artery. If the plaque is disturbed, platelets may begin to accumulate at the site and form a thrombus, or clot. A clot can continue to grow until it completely blocks an artery, cutting off the oxygen supply to a vital organ, or a clot can break free from the vessel wall (become an embolus) and become lodged somewhere else further downstream. This could lead to aheart attack or stroke if the clot completely blocks the blood and oxygen supply to a major artery leading to the heart or brain.

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ATHEROSCLEROSIS

atherosclerosis

What is atherosclerosis?

Atherosclerosis, also known as “hardening of the arteries,” is a condition in which cholesterol-rich plaque builds up along arterial walls. Research suggests that this process probably begins as a result of an injury to the endothelial (inside) lining of an artery wall. The injury may be the result of high cholesterol and triglyceride levels, high blood pressure, chronic system-wide inflammation, smoking and numerous other factors. In response to the injury, white blood cells, along with lipids (fats), begin to accumulate along the inner layer of the artery.The muscle layer of the artery may also grow, forming the basis of a plaque, which many grow large enough to block the artery. If the plaque is disturbed, blood platelets (cells that play a key role in blood clotting) may begin to accumulate at the site and form a clot, which can continue to grow until it completely blocks an artery and cuts off the oxygen supply to a vital organ. Alternatively, a clot can break free from the vessel wall and become lodged somewhere else further downstream. If the clot completely blocks the blood and oxygen supply to a major artery leading to the heart, the result is a heart attack. If an artery to the brain is blocked (as seen, for example, with carotid artery disease), the result is a stroke. Atherosclerosis that affects the arteries in the arms, legs or pelvis is called peripheral artery disease.

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HEART ATTACK

Heart Attack

What is a heart attack?

A heart attack (myocardial infarction) occurs when blood flow to a part of the heart is blocked, usually by a blood clot lodged in one of the coronary arteries. As a result, part of the heart muscle is damaged or dies.

What are the symptoms of a heart attack?

The most common symptom is chest pain that feels like a tight band around the chest. The pain can move to the arms, shoulders, neck, teeth, jaw, abdomen or back. It can be severe or mild. In some cases, the pain feels like bad indigestion, but it also may feel as if something heavy is sitting on the chest, like the chest is being squeezed, or like heavy pressure is being applied. Typically, the pain lasts longer than 20 minutes and isn’t relieved by rest or by taking nitroglycerin, a medication which may have been prescribed for angina, a classic symptom of cardiovascular disease that sometimes predicts heart attacks. Heart attack pain may ease and then return. Other symptoms can include anxiety, cough, fainting, lightheadedness, dizziness, nausea, vomiting, palpitations (the heart seems to be beating too fast), shortness of breath and/or heavy sweating.

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GESTATIONAL DIABETES

Gestational Diabetes

What is gestational diabetes?

Gestational diabetes is the development of diabetes during pregnancy. Although the symptoms disappear after the baby is born, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control, about half of all women diagnosed with gestational diabetes will develop type 2 diabetes later in life. Diabetes occurs when the body does not produce or properly use insulin, a hormone necessary to convert sugar, starches and other food into the energy needed for daily life. According to the National Institutes of Health, gestational diabetes occurs in about 5 percent of all pregnancies in the United States, resulting in about 200,000 cases a year.

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DIABETES (Type 2)

diabetes

What is type 2 diabetes?

Also called adult-onset diabetes, type 2 diabetes is a metabolic disorder resulting from the body’s inability to properly use or ultimately make enough insulin, the hormone that helps regulate sugar, starches and other foods the body uses for energy. It is the most common form of diabetes, accounting for 90 to 95 percent of all cases. Type 2 diabetes is nearing epidemic proportions in the United States as a result of a greater prevalence of obesity and sedentary lifestyles. The upswing is also due to the increasing number of older people in the population.

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DIABETES (Type 1)

Diabetes, Type 1

What is type 1 diabetes?

Type 1 diabetes is an autoimmune disorder that accounts for five to 10 percent of all cases of diabetes. It initially develops most often in children and young adults. With type 1 diabetes, the pancreas produces little or no insulin, the hormone needed to transport glucose into cells where it can be converted into energy. For this reason, if you have type 1 diabetes you will need to take insulin daily throughout your life. This form of diabetes has also been called juvenile or insulin-dependent diabetes.

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